Physics 203/4 Syllabus

Physics 203/4: Thermodynamics, Optics and Quantum Physics

Spring 1998 Syllabus and Exam Policy
The latest version of this document can be found at http://rt210.sl.psu.edu/faculty/Gallis/phys203n4.html
Instructor: Dr. Michael R. Gallis
Office: C112
Phone: 385-6053
email: mrg3@psu.edu
Office Hours: Monday,Wednesday 11-12
Tuesday 12-1
or by appointment
The materials needed for this course are the same as those required for the prerequisites Physics 201 and 202. The text is University Physics by Young and Freedman, 9th edition (extended version with Modern Physics). The student is also required to have a TI-85 calculator or the equivalent.

As with any university course, student preparation is essential. The student is expected to read the material in the text before the corresponding lecture, and is expected to review the appropriate material, including handouts, before lab. Students taking Physics 203 are still required to read the laboratory handouts. As Physics 201 and 202, Math 140 and 141 are prerequisites for this course, knowledge of the material presented there is assumed.

The student is expected to attend every class, and will be held responsible for all material covered in lecture. Students are expected to read material not covered in lecture, but which is on the syllabus. Students are expected to work every assigned problem as a minimum, and cannot expect to do well in the course unless they do. Additional homework problems may be assigned during lecture. Old exams will be on file in the library as an additional source of problems for the student.

Failure to take a scheduled exam will result in a grade of zero. Make-up exams will be given only in the event of illness (confirmed by a physician) or death in the immediate family. Completed lab reports are due at the beginning of the Friday Lecture during the same week of the experiment. Lab reports turned in late (anytime after the beginning of the period in which they are due) are subject to penalties: -1 for a report turned in within 1 week from when the labs are to be handed in, -2 for the following week, etc. No reports will be accepted after the second to the last week of classes. A student missing one lab report will receive a grade of -20 for that lab, and a student missing two or more will automatically receive a failing grade for the course, regardless of test scores.

Students will be supplied an equation sheet (consisting largely of equations from the relevant chapter summaries) for each exam to aid the student in remembering complex equations. A copy of the equation sheet will be made available to the students well in advance of the exams so that the students may better prepare for the exam. Any needed constants will be provided by the instructor. It is strongly advised that the students use the equation sheets as they do the homework, so that they are familiar with the equations and their appropriate use.

Grading Policy:

1. The grade will be determined the point total obtained from four midterm exams (100 points each) and a comprehensive final (200 points). For 204 students, the total will also include a 100 point laboratory grade based upon the laboratory reports. The lab reports are worth 10 points each and the lab grade is 10xaverage lab report grade. Students who put reasonable efforts into lab reports and turn them in on time will generally have their grade boosted by the laboratory component.

2. Grades will be determined approximately by the standard cutoffs (90% for an A, 80% for a B, ...). Plus and minus grades will be assigned as refinements of this scale. The Instructor will determine the actual cutoffs at the end of the semester.

Physics 203/4 Course Outline
Exercises and Problems
ChapterProblem
15Temperature and Heat Q 5-9, 12, 13, 16, 32 P 1, 2, 7, 8, 10, 15, 17, 19, 21, 22, 27, 29, 33-35, 37-39, 47, 53, 54, 56, 62-64, 73, 81, 83
16Thermal Properties of Matter Q 1, 11, 16, 17, 19, 20 P 1, 5, 7, 12, 14-16, 18, 21, 22, 24, 29-34, 46, 56, 59, 66-68
Exam I
17First Law Q 1, 4, 9, 12, 13, 17-19 P1-3, 6, 9, 11, 12, 14, 15, 17-20, 23-25, 28-31, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44-47
18Second Law Q 3, 5-9, 15, 16, 20 P 1-3, 6, 7, 9, 11, 14-16, 22-24, 32, 43, 44, 47, 52, 55
Exam II
34Nature and Propogation of Light Q 1, 4, 10-12, 19 P 1-4, 7, 8, 11-13, 15-17, 19, 20, 27, 28, 33
37Interference Q 1, 2, 7, 12, 13, 16 P 1, 2, 6-9, 11, 13, 15, 17-19, 21-24, 37, 38
38Diffraction Q 3, 7, 8 P 2, 3, 5, 6, 10, 11, 17-19, 21-25, 27-30, 33, 35, 38, 47, 49, 50
Exam III
35Geometric OpticsQ 1, 6, 8, 13, 19, 20, 25, 27 P 1, 2, 4, 7-9, 11-14, 16, 18, 19, 23, 26, 27, 29, 31, 33-35, 38, 39, 64, 69, 70, 80
36Optical Instruments Q 2, 8 P 2, 11, 12, 14, 16, 18, 19, 21, 24, 26, 40
Exam IV
40Photons, Electrons and Atoms Q 1, 2, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16 P 1-3, 6-8, 11-14, 17, 19, 21, 27-29, 34, 36, 39, 44, 48, 51, 52, 56, 60
41The Wave Nature of Particles (sect. 1-4) Q 1-3, 6 P 1-5, 7, 10, 12, 13, 24, 25
42Quantum Mechanics (sect. 1-6) P 1-4, 21, 23
44Molecules and Condensed Matter Q 1, 2, 6, 7, 11, 17 P 1, 4-7, 13, 14, 18, 22, 26, 27
45Nuclear Physics Q 1, 6, 15, 16 P 1, 2, 6, 7, 9, 11, 13-16, 20-22, 41, 45, 47, 49
Final
Laboratory Experiments
1.Coefficient of Linear Expansions 7.Microwave Optics
2.Specific Heat 8.Grating Spectrometer
3.Heat of Fusion of Water 9.Index of Refraction of Air
4.Joule Heating 10.Lens Bench
5.Hartl Optical Disk 11.Hydrogen Spectrum
6.Index of Refraction of Glass/Dispersion 12.Absorption of Gamma and Beta Particles
(addition/modification of labs is at the discretion of the instructor)